Artist Statements

Memento Vivere    My recent work expands an ongoing investigation of the interaction of memory, the passage of time, and of identity. I am keenly interested in how memory forms our sense of being and how that can be affected by the contradictions that the past and the present pose. In the act of remembering there is a point where reality and the interpretation of reality cross, and it’s that intersection that I wish to explore.    This series is personal and explores my memories of my brother- searching for that intersection between the memory of him visually and the memory of him viscerally. My process involves a push and a pull rhythm- fluctuating between the photographic act, which creates an emotional distance with the camera as a barrier, and an intimate physical process (printing and painting the image), which connects me even closer to his memory in a tangible way.    As a visual artist, I have found the qualities of photography, darkroom manipulation, and the malleability of paint to be uniquely sympathetic to this search. They allow me to intercede in the moment that a fixed image presents, juxtaposing within it a deeply subjective view of reality, formed in the shadow of remembrance.    In the series Memento Vivere, I am presenting a solitary protagonist in a narrative that plays out across the series. Various objects and symbols are combined with the figure portraying conceptual themes of memory, a sense of being, loss, identity, empathy, and the passage of time evoking an intimate visual language echoing personal dreams and childhood memories.

Memento Vivere

My recent work expands an ongoing investigation of the interaction of memory, the passage of time, and of identity. I am keenly interested in how memory forms our sense of being and how that can be affected by the contradictions that the past and the present pose. In the act of remembering there is a point where reality and the interpretation of reality cross, and it’s that intersection that I wish to explore.

This series is personal and explores my memories of my brother- searching for that intersection between the memory of him visually and the memory of him viscerally. My process involves a push and a pull rhythm- fluctuating between the photographic act, which creates an emotional distance with the camera as a barrier, and an intimate physical process (printing and painting the image), which connects me even closer to his memory in a tangible way.

As a visual artist, I have found the qualities of photography, darkroom manipulation, and the malleability of paint to be uniquely sympathetic to this search. They allow me to intercede in the moment that a fixed image presents, juxtaposing within it a deeply subjective view of reality, formed in the shadow of remembrance.

In the series Memento Vivere, I am presenting a solitary protagonist in a narrative that plays out across the series. Various objects and symbols are combined with the figure portraying conceptual themes of memory, a sense of being, loss, identity, empathy, and the passage of time evoking an intimate visual language echoing personal dreams and childhood memories.


Nothing comes from Nothing | Horizon    My interest in memory lies in the exploration of the relationships between the passage of time, repetition, and loss, including reappearance and forgetting. I work with both found photography and discarded Super 8mm film to reimagine personal as well as collective memories that challenge the photographic notion of truth and teeter on the possibility of fiction. The imagery is a diverse collection of composites, recreating layers and fragments of the past similar to the way memory is created, stored and recalled. I am searching for the balance between truth and fiction and seeking to reconcile that uncertainty.  The title of this series, “Nothing comes from nothing”, is referred to in many literary sources- The Bible, Shakespeare, Classic philosophy, theatre, film, and music. These varied references include the idea that existence is an infinite succession of moments, and even with no change, there is temporal change. I am keenly interested in the altering of memory over time, and the subsequent narrative that speaks hauntingly to the present.

Nothing comes from Nothing | Horizon

My interest in memory lies in the exploration of the relationships between the passage of time, repetition, and loss, including reappearance and forgetting. I work with both found photography and discarded Super 8mm film to reimagine personal as well as collective memories that challenge the photographic notion of truth and teeter on the possibility of fiction. The imagery is a diverse collection of composites, recreating layers and fragments of the past similar to the way memory is created, stored and recalled. I am searching for the balance between truth and fiction and seeking to reconcile that uncertainty.

The title of this series, “Nothing comes from nothing”, is referred to in many literary sources- The Bible, Shakespeare, Classic philosophy, theatre, film, and music. These varied references include the idea that existence is an infinite succession of moments, and even with no change, there is temporal change. I am keenly interested in the altering of memory over time, and the subsequent narrative that speaks hauntingly to the present.


Home Movies | True North   After collecting vintage snapshots for decades, I began to notice discarded home movies in flea markets and antique shops that grabbed my attention. The simple cinematic narratives in the found movies intrigued me as I wondered what made these occasions so important that they would be immortalized on film? The recordings of benign family trips, scenic skylines, and everyday life were so iconic and yet mysterious; the unfamiliar places and unnamed people seemed lost in their anonymity. I came to discover that each filmed story was a testimony to the past, loss, love, and memory — a memory that could be revisited over and over again and reanimated on demand.  In the series  Home Movies , I am creating segmented imagery to explore connections between the passage of time, transition/transformation, loss, and memory. The seemingly spontaneous found images are reframed to reveal gestures of unfinished stories and convey memory in a narrative form. The series integrates my interest in art history, color theory, and found imagery, using photographic processes and today’s technology. Color and mark-making are also used to emphasize or diminish certain elements of the photographic image, similar to the deterioration and fading of memory and material things over time. Each print is toned with various solutions, and details are painted out or painted in, using oil and acrylic paints, transforming the vintage image through time as it is re-created in its new state, and in a new context.

Home Movies | True North

After collecting vintage snapshots for decades, I began to notice discarded home movies in flea markets and antique shops that grabbed my attention. The simple cinematic narratives in the found movies intrigued me as I wondered what made these occasions so important that they would be immortalized on film? The recordings of benign family trips, scenic skylines, and everyday life were so iconic and yet mysterious; the unfamiliar places and unnamed people seemed lost in their anonymity. I came to discover that each filmed story was a testimony to the past, loss, love, and memory — a memory that could be revisited over and over again and reanimated on demand.

In the series Home Movies, I am creating segmented imagery to explore connections between the passage of time, transition/transformation, loss, and memory. The seemingly spontaneous found images are reframed to reveal gestures of unfinished stories and convey memory in a narrative form. The series integrates my interest in art history, color theory, and found imagery, using photographic processes and today’s technology. Color and mark-making are also used to emphasize or diminish certain elements of the photographic image, similar to the deterioration and fading of memory and material things over time. Each print is toned with various solutions, and details are painted out or painted in, using oil and acrylic paints, transforming the vintage image through time as it is re-created in its new state, and in a new context.


In the In-Between | From a Distance   The idea of exploring the use of paintings as photography came out of the question “What is a photograph?” I began by using early European masters’ paintings in a photographic context to create a dialogue between the two mediums and investigate the sense of time and the historical gap between them. In the series  In the In-Between , I am combining early European masters’ paintings with modern technology, photographic techniques, and surface to juxtapose the past and the present. The original painted images are printed in reverse photographically, and then painted abstractly, compressing and expanding the connections between the passage of time, transition, transformation, and memory. The series integrates my interest in art history, color theory, and found imagery. Color and mark-making are also used to emphasize or diminish certain elements of the photographic image, similar to the deterioration and fading of physical and material things over time.  This series is an exploration of the past and the transition to the present. As I artistically engage with these painted images, I am building my own visual language through color theory, scale, and texture to elicit an emotional response and to activate a new context.  My creative process is about searching, looking, and finding. It includes resurrection and reimagination, and it is slow, requiring time, waiting, and craft. I find images in junk shops, flea markets, books, and on the Internet, and then recapture them on film and print the new image in the darkroom. I love using film with all of its fragility and flaws. In Japanese, the beautiful word  natsukashii  (懐かしい) identifies the feeling of evocative longing for something past — a yearning nostalgia that’s also very sad, as it reminds you that what you remember will never happen again. Film physically manifests this emotion in a metaphorical way, capturing a moment that comes and goes, then vanishes, leaving only the visual record behind as proof of its existence.

In the In-Between | From a Distance

The idea of exploring the use of paintings as photography came out of the question “What is a photograph?” I began by using early European masters’ paintings in a photographic context to create a dialogue between the two mediums and investigate the sense of time and the historical gap between them. In the series In the In-Between, I am combining early European masters’ paintings with modern technology, photographic techniques, and surface to juxtapose the past and the present. The original painted images are printed in reverse photographically, and then painted abstractly, compressing and expanding the connections between the passage of time, transition, transformation, and memory. The series integrates my interest in art history, color theory, and found imagery. Color and mark-making are also used to emphasize or diminish certain elements of the photographic image, similar to the deterioration and fading of physical and material things over time.

This series is an exploration of the past and the transition to the present. As I artistically engage with these painted images, I am building my own visual language through color theory, scale, and texture to elicit an emotional response and to activate a new context.

My creative process is about searching, looking, and finding. It includes resurrection and reimagination, and it is slow, requiring time, waiting, and craft. I find images in junk shops, flea markets, books, and on the Internet, and then recapture them on film and print the new image in the darkroom. I love using film with all of its fragility and flaws. In Japanese, the beautiful word natsukashii (懐かしい) identifies the feeling of evocative longing for something past — a yearning nostalgia that’s also very sad, as it reminds you that what you remember will never happen again. Film physically manifests this emotion in a metaphorical way, capturing a moment that comes and goes, then vanishes, leaving only the visual record behind as proof of its existence.


One Moment | Canoe   I have been collecting vintage snapshots for decades and am intrigued by the mysterious stories that each one holds. The found images are similar to my own family photos, yet the unfamiliar places and unnamed people seemed lost in their anonymity. As I discover each image, I am impacted viscerally by their testimony to the past, loss, love, and memory — a time and a place indelibly frozen in a unique circumstance, in an impermanent moment.  In the series  One Moment , I am exploring connections between the passage of time, transition/transformation, loss, and memory. The series integrates my interest in art history, color theory, and found imagery, using photographic processes and today’s technology. Color and mark-making are also used to emphasize or diminish certain elements of the photographic image, similar to the deterioration and fading of physical and material things over time. Each print is toned with various solutions, teas, or coffees, and details are painted out or painted in, using oil and acrylic paints, transforming the vintage image through time as it is re-created in its new state, and in a new context.

One Moment | Canoe

I have been collecting vintage snapshots for decades and am intrigued by the mysterious stories that each one holds. The found images are similar to my own family photos, yet the unfamiliar places and unnamed people seemed lost in their anonymity. As I discover each image, I am impacted viscerally by their testimony to the past, loss, love, and memory — a time and a place indelibly frozen in a unique circumstance, in an impermanent moment.

In the series One Moment, I am exploring connections between the passage of time, transition/transformation, loss, and memory. The series integrates my interest in art history, color theory, and found imagery, using photographic processes and today’s technology. Color and mark-making are also used to emphasize or diminish certain elements of the photographic image, similar to the deterioration and fading of physical and material things over time. Each print is toned with various solutions, teas, or coffees, and details are painted out or painted in, using oil and acrylic paints, transforming the vintage image through time as it is re-created in its new state, and in a new context.